Non-Fiction

Gratitude

The importance of appreciation and thankfulness are examined through accessible text.  There is a focus on how this character strength balances other qualities and gives successful people perspective and a healthy approach to life.

A Pebble for Your Pocket

Drawn from Thich Nhat Hanh's Dharma talks given to young people, A Pebble for Your Pocket presents the basic teachings of the Buddha in accessible and modern language. Combining the stories and mediation practices from the previous edition of A Pebble for your Pocket with those collected in Under the Rose Apple Tree plus several new stories, this completely revised edition is written in a conversational style, and is comprised of Buddhist parables, and stories from the author's own childhood experiences.

Born a Crime

Comedian Trevor Noah tells stories of himself as a mischievous young boy who grows into a restless young man as he struggles to find himself in a world where he was never supposed to exist. Whether being thrown from a moving car during an attempted kidnapping or just trying to survive the pitfalls of dating in high school, Trevor illuminates his curious world with an incisive wit and unflinching honesty.

Killers of the Flower Moon

In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian Nation in Oklahoma, due to a discovery of oil beneath their land. Then, one by one, they began to be killed off. One Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, watched as her family was murdered. And it was just the beginning, as more Osage began to die under mysterious circumstances.

Hillbilly Elegy

Hillbilly Elegy is a passionate and personal analysis of a culture in crisis—that of white working-class Americans. The disintegration of this group, a process that has been slowly occurring now for more than forty years, has been reported with growing frequency and alarm, but has never before been written about as searingly from the inside. J. D. Vance tells the true story of what a social, regional, and class decline feels like when you were born with it hung around your neck.

Visiting Feelings

Visiting Feelings encourages children to treat their feelings like guests -- welcome them in, get to know them, and perhaps learn why they are visiting. Through this purposeful and mindful exploration, Visiting Feelings harnesses a young child's innate capacity to fully experience the present moment and invites children to sense, explore, and befriend all of their feelings with acceptance and equanimity.

A Note to Parents provides more information about emotional awareness and mindfulness, plus practical advice and activities for introducing mindfulness into daily family routine.